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Communication of Psychiatric Risk in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Pilot Project

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Genetic Counseling, November 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
Title
Communication of Psychiatric Risk in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Pilot Project
Published in
Journal of Genetic Counseling, November 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10897-015-9910-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah J. Hart, Kelly Schoch, Vandana Shashi, Nancy Callanan

Abstract

Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an increased chance of developing a psychiatric disorder. While parents of children affected by 22q11.2DS typically receive counseling about risk for non-psychiatric health concerns, genetic counselors may be reluctant to discuss psychiatric risk. Further education of genetic counselors may be necessary to encourage discussion of psychiatric risk with these families. The goal of this project was to develop recommendations for genetic counselors to provide psychiatric risk information to families affected by 22q11.2DS. The recommendations were developed by synthesizing resources in the literature about risk communication. These recommendations were refined following an online focus group meeting with five health care professionals who were recruited for participation from 22q11.2DS clinics across the U.S.A. The focus group data revealed three themes related to discussion of psychiatric risk: 1) Stepwise approach, 2) Discussing treatment options and reducing risks, and 3) Addressing stigma. These recommendations may be used as a foundation for a future clinical protocol to encourage discussion about the risk for psychiatric illness at an earlier point in the diagnostic process for 22q11.2DS and to provide improved information, support and resources to affected families.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Other 21 23%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 31%
Psychology 20 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 17 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2021.
All research outputs
#10,379,297
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#526
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#175,989
of 373,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#4
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,084 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.