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Folic Acid Supplementation for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
89 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
235 tweeters
facebook
27 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
128 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
172 Mendeley
Title
Folic Acid Supplementation for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects
Published in
JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, January 2017
DOI 10.1001/jama.2016.19438
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, David C. Grossman, Susan J. Curry, Karina W. Davidson, John W. Epling, Francisco A.R. García, Alex R. Kemper, Alex H. Krist, Ann E. Kurth, C. Seth Landefeld, Carol M. Mangione, William R. Phillips, Maureen G. Phipps, Michael P. Pignone, Michael Silverstein, Chien-Wen Tseng

Abstract

Neural tube defects are among the most common major congenital anomalies in the United States and may lead to a range of disabilities or death. Daily folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent neural tube defects. However, most women do not receive the recommended daily intake of folate from diet alone. To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age. In 2009, the USPSTF reviewed the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age for the prevention of neural tube defects in infants. The current review assessed new evidence on the benefits and harms of folic acid supplementation. The USPSTF assessed the balance of the benefits and harms of folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age and determined that the net benefit is substantial. Evidence is adequate that the harms to the mother or infant from folic acid supplementation taken at the usual doses are no greater than small. Therefore, the USPSTF reaffirms its 2009 recommendation. The USPSTF recommends that all women who are planning or capable of pregnancy take a daily supplement containing 0.4 to 0.8 mg (400-800 µg) of folic acid. (A recommendation).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 235 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Canada 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Unknown 168 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 28 16%
Student > Master 27 16%
Other 17 10%
Student > Postgraduate 13 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 8%
Other 44 26%
Unknown 30 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 64 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Other 21 12%
Unknown 36 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 894. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2019.
All research outputs
#9,973
of 17,656,856 outputs
Outputs from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#311
of 29,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#341
of 395,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#15
of 376 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,656,856 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 65.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 376 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.