↓ Skip to main content

Clinical Follow-Up for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Newborn Screening: A Proposal

Overview of attention for article published in Muscle & Nerve, June 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Clinical Follow-Up for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Newborn Screening: A Proposal
Published in
Muscle & Nerve, June 2016
DOI 10.1002/mus.25185
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer M. Kwon, Hoda Z. Abdel-Hamid, Samiah A. Al-Zaidy, Jerry R. Mendell, Annie Kennedy, Kathi Kinnett, Valerie A. Cwik, Natalie Street, Julie Bolen, John W. Day, Anne M. Connolly

Abstract

New developments in the rapid diagnosis and treatment of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have led to growing enthusiasm for instituting DMD newborn screening (NBS) in the United States. Our group has been interested in developing clinical guidance to be implemented consistently in specialty care clinics (SCC) charged with the care of pre-symptomatically identified newborns referred after DMD-NBS. We reviewed the existing literature covering patient-centered clinical follow-up after NBS, educational material from public health and advocacy sites, and federal recommendations on effective newborn screening follow-up. We discussed the review as a group and added our own experience to develop materials suitable for initial parent and primary care provider education. These materials and a series of templates for subspecialist encounters could be used to provide consistent care across centers and serve as the basis for ongoing quality improvement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 19%
Other 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 8 25%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,639,710
of 12,526,930 outputs
Outputs from Muscle & Nerve
#443
of 1,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,453
of 262,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Muscle & Nerve
#22
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,526,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,875 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.