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Recommendations for genetic testing to reduce the incidence of anthracycline‐induced cardiotoxicity

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
111 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
137 Mendeley
Title
Recommendations for genetic testing to reduce the incidence of anthracycline‐induced cardiotoxicity
Published in
British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, June 2016
DOI 10.1111/bcp.13008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Folefac Aminkeng, Colin J. D. Ross, Shahrad R. Rassekh, Soomi Hwang, Michael J. Rieder, Amit P. Bhavsar, Anne Smith, Shubhayan Sanatani, Karen A. Gelmon, Daniel Bernstein, Michael R. Hayden, Ursula Amstutz, Bruce C. Carleton

Abstract

Anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (ACT) occurs in 57% of treated patients and remains an important limitation of anthracycline-based chemotherapy. In various genetic association studies, potential genetic risk markers for ACT have been identified. Therefore, we developed evidence-based clinical practice recommendations for pharmacogenomic testing to further individualize therapy based on ACT risk. We followed a standard guideline development process; including a systematic literature search, evidence synthesis and critical appraisal, and the development of clinical practice recommendations with an international expert group. RARG rs2229774, SLC28A3 rs7853758 and UGT1A6 rs17863783 variants currently have the strongest and the most consistent evidence for association with ACT. Genetic variants in ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCC5, ABCB1, ABCB4, CBR3, RAC2, NCF4, CYBA, GSTP1, CAT, SULT2B1, POR, HAS3, SLC22A7, SCL22A17, HFE and NOS3 have also been associated with ACT, but require additional validation. We recommend pharmacogenomic testing for the RARG rs2229774 (S427L), SLC28A3 rs7853758 (L461L) and UGT1A6*4 rs17863783 (V209V) variants in childhood cancer patients with an indication for doxorubicin or daunorubicin therapy (Level B - moderate). Based on an overall risk stratification, taking into account genetic and clinical risk factors, we recommend a number of management options including increased frequency of echocardiogram monitoring, follow-up, as well as therapeutic options within the current standard of clinical practice. Existing evidence demonstrates that genetic factors have the potential to improve the discrimination between individuals at higher and lower risk of ACT. Genetic testing may therefore support both patient care decisions and evidence development for an improved prevention of ACT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Singapore 1 <1%
Unknown 136 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Student > Master 18 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 10%
Other 27 20%
Unknown 21 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 15 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 6%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 30 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,254,243
of 16,525,235 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
#358
of 4,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,537
of 269,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
#5
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,525,235 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,175 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.