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KRAS G12V Mutation Detection by Droplet Digital PCR in Circulating Cell-Free DNA of Colorectal Cancer Patients

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Molecular Sciences, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
Title
KRAS G12V Mutation Detection by Droplet Digital PCR in Circulating Cell-Free DNA of Colorectal Cancer Patients
Published in
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, April 2016
DOI 10.3390/ijms17040484
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susana Olmedillas López, Dolores García-Olmo, Mariano García-Arranz, Héctor Guadalajara, Carlos Pastor, Damián García-Olmo

Abstract

KRAS mutations are responsible for resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in colorectal cancer patients. These mutations sometimes appear once treatment has started. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free DNA in plasma ("liquid biopsy") by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has emerged as a very sensitive and promising alternative to serial biopsies for disease monitoring. In this study, KRAS G12V mutation was analyzed by ddPCR in plasma DNA from 10 colorectal cancer patients and compared to six healthy donors. The percentage of KRAS G12V mutation relative to wild-type sequences in tumor-derived DNA was also determined. KRAS G12V mutation circulating in plasma was detected in 9 of 10 colorectal cancer patients whose tumors were also mutated. Colorectal cancer patients had 35.62 copies of mutated KRAS/mL plasma, whereas in healthy controls only residual copies were found (0.62 copies/mL, p = 0.0066). Interestingly, patients with metastatic disease showed a significantly higher number of mutant copies than M0 patients (126.25 versus 9.37 copies/mL, p = 0.0286). Wild-type KRAS was also significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy controls (7718.8 versus 481.25 copies/mL, p = 0.0002). In conclusion, KRAS G12V mutation is detectable in plasma of colorectal cancer patients by ddPCR and could be used as a non-invasive biomarker.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 1%
Unknown 85 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Other 12 14%
Student > Master 12 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 13%
Computer Science 3 3%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 10 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,902,830
of 7,551,260 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Molecular Sciences
#708
of 4,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,274
of 271,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Molecular Sciences
#63
of 344 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,551,260 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,535 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,265 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 344 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.