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Recommendations for genetic testing and counselling after sudden cardiac death: practical aspects for Swiss practice.

Overview of attention for article published in Swiss Medical Weekly, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Recommendations for genetic testing and counselling after sudden cardiac death: practical aspects for Swiss practice.
Published in
Swiss Medical Weekly, January 2018
DOI 10.4414/smw.2018.14638
Pubmed ID
Authors

Medeiros Domingo, Argelia, Bolliger, Stephan, Gräni, Christoph, Rieubland, Claudine, Hersch, Deborah, Asatryan, Babken, Schyma, Christian, Saguner, Ardan, Wyler, Daniel, Bhuiyan, Zahir, Fellman, Florence, Osculati, Antonio Marco, Ringger, Rebekka, Fokstuen, Siv, Sabatasso, Sara, Wilhelm, Matthias, Michaud, Katarzyna, , , Swiss Working Group on Sudden Cardiac Death, , Argelia Medeiros Domingo, Stephan Bolliger, Christoph Gräni, Claudine Rieubland, Deborah Hersch, Babken Asatryan, Christian Schyma, Ardan Saguner, Daniel Wyler, Zahir Bhuiyan, Florence Fellman, Antonio Marco Osculati, Rebekka Ringger, Siv Fokstuen, Sara Sabatasso, Matthias Wilhelm, Katarzyna Michaud, Swiss Working Group on Sudden Cardiac Death

Abstract

There is a need to standardise, within a coordinated Swiss framework, the practical aspects of genetic testing and genetic counselling on possibly inherited cardiovascular disorders in relatives of a sudden cardiac death (SCD) victim. Because of the major advances in genetic investigation techniques and recent publication of international guidelines in the field of cardiology, genetics and pathology, we consider it important to summarise the current evidence and propose an optimal approach to post-mortem genetic investigation for SCD victims and their families in Switzerland. In this article, we discuss important technical, financial and medico-ethical aspects, and provide updated information on specific situations in which forensic pathologists, general practitioners and cardiologists should suspect a genetic origin of the SCD. At present, the principles of benefit, the duty to warn and the impact of genetic information for family members at risk are considered as strong justifications for post-mortem disclosure and prevail over the arguments of respect for a deceased person's privacy and confidentiality. This paper underlines also the need to update and improve the general knowledge concerning the genetic risk of cardiovascular pathologies, the importance to perform an autopsy and post-mortem genetic testing in SCD victims, and to develop standardized post-mortem disclosure policy at national and international levels for SCD cases and relatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Materials Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2018.
All research outputs
#5,306,191
of 17,052,219 outputs
Outputs from Swiss Medical Weekly
#255
of 1,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,254
of 281,522 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Swiss Medical Weekly
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,052,219 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,032 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,522 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.