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Clinical Practice Guideline for the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in women from HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) families

Overview of attention for article published in Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine), November 2015
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Citations

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Title
Clinical Practice Guideline for the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in women from HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) families
Published in
Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine), November 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00508-015-0880-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

C.F. Singer, M.K. Tea, G. Pristauz, M. Hubalek, C. Rappaport, C.C. Riedl, T.H. Helbich

Abstract

An estimated 10 % of breast cancer cases exhibit a higher familial incidence, and functional mutations in BRCA (breast cancer-gene) 1 or 2 are responsible for the development of malignant tumors in approximately half of these cases. Women with a germline mutation in either of the two genes have a lifetime risk of up to 85 % to develop breast cancer, and of up to 60 % risk to develop ovarian cancer. This clinical practice guideline defines the individual and familial tumor constellations that represent an indication for BRCA germline testing. It also describes the therapeutic options (early detection programme vs prophylactic surgery) that arise from the result of a BRCA mutational analysis. This guideline further includes recommendations regarding the use of multigene panels and therapeutic aspects that arise from the selective use of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in patients with known BRCA1 or 2 mutations. It replaces the previous version of the "Clinical Practice Guideline for the Prevention and Early Detection of Breast- and Ovarian Cancer in women from HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) families" which was published in 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Other 6 19%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2015.
All research outputs
#10,032,729
of 12,538,991 outputs
Outputs from Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine)
#352
of 472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,436
of 275,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Die Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (The Middle European Journal of Medicine)
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,991 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 472 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.