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Vital Signs : Containment of Novel Multidrug-Resistant Organisms and Resistance Mechanisms — United States, 2006–2017

Overview of attention for article published in MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
62 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
98 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
Vital Signs : Containment of Novel Multidrug-Resistant Organisms and Resistance Mechanisms — United States, 2006–2017
Published in
MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, April 2018
DOI 10.15585/mmwr.mm6713e1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate Russell Woodworth, Maroya Spalding Walters, Lindsey M. Weiner, Jonathan Edwards, Allison C. Brown, Jennifer Y. Huang, Sarah Malik, Rachel B. Slayton, Prabasaj Paul, Catherine Capers, Marion A. Kainer, Nancy Wilde, Alicia Shugart, Garrett Mahon, Alexander J. Kallen, Jean Patel, L. Clifford McDonald, Arjun Srinivasan, Michael Craig, Denise M. Cardo

Abstract

Approaches to controlling emerging antibiotic resistance in health care settings have evolved over time. When resistance to broad-spectrum antimicrobials mediated by extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) arose in the 1980s, targeted interventions to slow spread were not widely promoted. However, when Enterobacteriaceae with carbapenemases that confer resistance to carbapenem antibiotics emerged, directed control efforts were recommended. These distinct approaches could have resulted in differences in spread of these two pathogens. CDC evaluated these possible changes along with initial findings of an enhanced antibiotic resistance detection and control strategy that builds on interventions developed to control carbapenem resistance. Infection data from the National Healthcare Safety Network from 2006-2015 were analyzed to calculate changes in the annual proportion of selected pathogens that were nonsusceptible to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESBL phenotype) or resistant to carbapenems (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae [CRE]). Testing results for CRE and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) are also reported. The percentage of ESBL phenotype Enterobacteriaceae decreased by 2% per year (risk ratio [RR] = 0.98, p<0.001); by comparison, the CRE percentage decreased by 15% per year (RR = 0.85, p<0.01). From January to September 2017, carbapenemase testing was performed for 4,442 CRE and 1,334 CRPA isolates; 32% and 1.9%, respectively, were carbapenemase producers. In response, 1,489 screening tests were performed to identify asymptomatic carriers; 171 (11%) were positive. The proportion of Enterobacteriaceae infections that were CRE remained lower and decreased more over time than the proportion that were ESBL phenotype. This difference might be explained by the more directed control efforts implemented to slow transmission of CRE than those applied for ESBL-producing strains. Increased detection and aggressive early response to emerging antibiotic resistance threats have the potential to slow further spread.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 98 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 20%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 15 25%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 585. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2018.
All research outputs
#17,780
of 16,024,112 outputs
Outputs from MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report
#184
of 2,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#717
of 281,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age from MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report
#10
of 178 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,024,112 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 163.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,231 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 178 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.