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Pediatric clinical exome/genome sequencing and the engagement process: encouraging active conversation with the older child and adolescent: points to consider—a statement of the American College of…

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics in Medicine, March 2018
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
Pediatric clinical exome/genome sequencing and the engagement process: encouraging active conversation with the older child and adolescent: points to consider—a statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG)
Published in
Genetics in Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1038/gim.2018.36
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lynn W Bush, Louis E Bartoshesky, Karen L David, Benjamin Wilfond, Janet L Williams, Ingrid A Holm

Abstract

Disclaimer: This article is designed primarily as an educational resource for medical geneticists and other health care providers to help them provide quality patient care. Adherence to the information contained in this article does not necessarily assure a successful medical outcome. This information and any associated recommendations should not be considered inclusive of all proper procedures and tests or exclusive of other procedures and tests that are reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. In determining the propriety of any specific procedure or test, each provider should apply his or her own professional judgment to the specific clinical circumstances presented by the individual patient. It may be prudent, however, to document in the patient's record the rationale for any significant deviation from the recommendations set forth in this article. This article is copyrighted and is property of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.Genetics in Medicine advance online publication, 22 March 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2018.36.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 17%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Professor 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2018.
All research outputs
#9,383,517
of 16,534,657 outputs
Outputs from Genetics in Medicine
#1,834
of 2,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,020
of 283,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics in Medicine
#37
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,534,657 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,246 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.