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Consensus guidelines for newborn screening, diagnosis and treatment of infantile Krabbe disease

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2018
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4 tweeters

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28 Dimensions

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55 Mendeley
Title
Consensus guidelines for newborn screening, diagnosis and treatment of infantile Krabbe disease
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13023-018-0766-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer M. Kwon, Dietrich Matern, Joanne Kurtzberg, Lawrence Wrabetz, Michael H. Gelb, David A. Wenger, Can Ficicioglu, Amy T. Waldman, Barbara K. Burton, Patrick V. Hopkins, Joseph J. Orsini

Abstract

Krabbe disease is a rare neurodegenerative genetic disorder caused by deficiency of galactocerebrosidase. Patients with the infantile form of Krabbe disease can be treated at a presymptomatic stage with human stem cell transplantation which improves survival and clinical outcomes. However, without a family history, most cases of infantile Krabbe disease present after onset of symptoms and are ineligible for transplantation. In 2006, New York began screening newborns for Krabbe disease to identify presymptomatic cases. To ensure that those identified with infantile disease received timely treatment, New York public health and medical systems took steps to accurately diagnose and rapidly refer infants for human stem cell transplantation within the first few weeks of life. After 11 years of active screening in New York and the introduction of Krabbe disease newborn screening in other states, new information has been gained which can inform the design of newborn screening programs to improve infantile Krabbe disease outcomes. Recent information relevant to Krabbe disease screening, diagnosis, and treatment were assessed by a diverse group of public health, medical, and advocacy professionals. Outcomes after newborn screening may improve if treatment for infantile disease is initiated before 30 days of life. Newer laboratory screening and diagnostic tools can improve the speed and specificity of diagnosis and help facilitate this early referral. Given the rarity of Krabbe disease, most recommendations were based on case series or expert opinion. This report updates recommendations for Krabbe disease newborn screening to improve the timeliness of diagnosis and treatment of infantile Krabbe disease. In the United States, several states have begun or are considering Krabbe disease newborn screening. These recommendations can guide public health laboratories on methodologies for screening and inform clinicians about the need to promptly diagnose and treat infantile Krabbe disease. The timing of the initial referral after newborn screening, the speed of diagnostic confirmation of infantile disease, and the transplantation center's experience and ability to rapidly respond to a suspected patient with newly diagnosed infantile Krabbe disease are critical for optimal outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Other 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 18 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2020.
All research outputs
#9,822,247
of 16,651,463 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1,069
of 1,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,713
of 372,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,651,463 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,768 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them