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Unique genetic profiles from cerebrospinal fluid cell-free DNA in leptomeningeal metastases of EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer: a new medium of liquid biopsy

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Oncology, April 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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90 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
Title
Unique genetic profiles from cerebrospinal fluid cell-free DNA in leptomeningeal metastases of EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer: a new medium of liquid biopsy
Published in
Annals of Oncology, April 2018
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdy009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Y.S. Li, B.Y. Jiang, J.J. Yang, X.C. Zhang, Z. Zhang, J.Y. Ye, W.Z. Zhong, H.Y. Tu, H.J. Chen, Z. Wang, C.R. Xu, B.C. Wang, H.J. Du, S. Chuai, H. Han-Zhang, J. Su, Q. Zhou, X.N. Yang, W.B. Guo, H.H. Yan, Y.H. Liu, L.X. Yan, B. Huang, M.M. Zheng, Y.L. Wu

Abstract

Leptomeningeal metastases (LM) are more frequent in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. Due to limited access to leptomeningeal lesions, the purpose of this study was to explore the potential role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a source of liquid biopsy in patients with LM. Primary tumor, CSF, and plasma in NSCLC with LM were tested by next-generation sequencing. In total, 45 patients with suspected LM underwent lumbar puncture, and those with EGFR mutations diagnosed with LM were enrolled. 28 patients were enrolled in this cohort; CSF and plasma were available in 26 patients, respectively. Driver genes were detected in 100% (26/26), 84.6% (22/26) and 73.1% (19/26) of samples comprising CSF cell-free DNA (cfDNA), CSF precipitates, and plasma, respectively; 92.3% (24/26) of patients had much higher allele fractions in CSF cfDNA than the other two media. Unique genetic profiles were captured in CSF cfDNA compared to those in plasma and primary tissue. Multiple copy number variations (CNVs) were mainly identified in CSF cfDNA, and MET copy number gain identified in 47.8% (11/23) of patients was the most frequent one, while other CNVs included ERBB2, KRAS, ALK, and MYC. Moreover, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of TP53 was identified in 73.1% (19/26) CSF cfDNA, which was much higher than that in plasma (2/26, 7.7%; p < 0.001). There was a trend towards a higher frequency of concomitant resistance mutations in patients with TP53 LOH than those without (70.6% vs. 33.3%; p =0.162). EGFR T790M was identified in CSF cfDNA of 30.4% (7/23) of patients who experienced TKI progression. CSF cfDNA could reveal the unique genetic profiles of LM and should be considered as the most representative liquid biopsy medium for LM in EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 24%
Student > Master 7 13%
Other 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,492,409
of 14,107,364 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Oncology
#4,108
of 5,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,239
of 448,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Oncology
#139
of 212 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,107,364 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,806 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 448,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 212 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.