↓ Skip to main content

Genetic testing for exercise prescription and injury prevention: AIS-Athlome consortium-FIMS joint statement

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
Title
Genetic testing for exercise prescription and injury prevention: AIS-Athlome consortium-FIMS joint statement
Published in
BMC Genomics, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4185-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole Vlahovich, David C. Hughes, Lyn R. Griffiths, Guan Wang, Yannis P. Pitsiladis, Fabio Pigozzi, Nobert Bachl, Nir Eynon

Abstract

There has been considerable growth in basic knowledge and understanding of how genes are influencing response to exercise training and predisposition to injuries and chronic diseases. On the basis of this knowledge, clinical genetic tests may in the future allow the personalisation and optimisation of physical activity, thus providing an avenue for increased efficiency of exercise prescription for health and disease. This review provides an overview of the current status of genetic testing for the purposes of exercise prescription and injury prevention. As such there are a variety of potential uses for genetic testing, including identification of risks associated with participation in sport and understanding individual response to particular types of exercise. However, there are many challenges remaining before genetic testing has evidence-based practical applications; including adoption of international standards for genomics research, as well as resistance against the agendas driven by direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies. Here we propose a way forward to develop an evidence-based approach to support genetic testing for exercise prescription and injury prevention. Based on current knowledge, there is no current clinical application for genetic testing in the area of exercise prescription and injury prevention, however the necessary steps are outlined for the development of evidence-based clinical applications involving genetic testing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Other 6 8%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 17%
Sports and Recreations 12 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 21 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,084,129
of 17,071,340 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#276
of 9,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,219
of 274,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#36
of 813 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,071,340 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,191 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 813 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.