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Expanded Newborn Screening: Information and Resources for the Family Physician.

Overview of attention for article published in American Family Physician, June 2017
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45 Mendeley
Title
Expanded Newborn Screening: Information and Resources for the Family Physician.
Published in
American Family Physician, June 2017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weismiller, David Glenn

Abstract

Each year, 4 to 5 million newborns receive state-mandated screening. Although the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children has identified 34 core conditions that should be incorporated into screening programs, each state manages, funds, and maintains its own program. State programs encompass screening, as well as the diagnosis and coordination of care for newborns with positive findings. Testing for core disorders is fairly standardized, but more extensive screening varies widely by state, and the rigorous evaluation of new screening panels is ongoing. The core panel includes testing for three main categories of disorders: metabolic disorders (e.g., amino acid and urea cycle, fatty acid oxidation, and organic acid disorders); hemoglobinopathies; and a group of assorted conditions, including congenital hearing loss. Family physicians must be familiar with the expanded newborn screening tests to effectively communicate results to parents and formulate interventions. They must also recognize signs of metabolic disorders that may not be detected by screening tests or that may not be a part of standard newborn screening in their state. For infants with positive screening results leading to diagnosis, long-term follow-up involves ongoing parental education, regular medical examinations, management at a metabolic treatment center, and developmental and neuropsychological testing to detect associated disorders in time for early intervention.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Postgraduate 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 11 24%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,244,129
of 11,547,113 outputs
Outputs from American Family Physician
#1,036
of 1,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,980
of 264,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Family Physician
#15
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,547,113 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,181 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,111 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.