↓ Skip to main content

Recommendations for Cancer Surveillance in Individuals with RASopathies and Other Rare Genetic Conditions with Increased Cancer Risk

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Cancer Research, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
60 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Recommendations for Cancer Surveillance in Individuals with RASopathies and Other Rare Genetic Conditions with Increased Cancer Risk
Published in
Clinical Cancer Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-17-0631
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anita Villani, Mary-Louise C. Greer, Jennifer M. Kalish, Akira Nakagawara, Katherine L. Nathanson, Kristian W. Pajtler, Stefan M. Pfister, Michael F. Walsh, Jonathan D. Wasserman, Kristin Zelley, Christian P. Kratz

Abstract

In October 2016, the American Association for Cancer Research held a meeting of international childhood cancer predisposition syndrome experts to evaluate the current knowledge of these syndromes and to propose consensus surveillance recommendations. Herein, we summarize clinical and genetic aspects of RASopathies and Sotos, Weaver, Rubinstein-Taybi, Schinzel-Giedion, and NKX2-1 syndromes as well as specific metabolic disorders known to be associated with increased childhood cancer risk. In addition, the expert panel reviewed whether sufficient data exist to make a recommendation that all patients with these disorders be offered cancer surveillance. For all syndromes, the panel recommends increased awareness and prompt assessment of clinical symptoms. Patients with Costello syndrome have the highest cancer risk, and cancer surveillance should be considered. Regular physical examinations and complete blood counts can be performed in infants with Noonan syndrome if specific PTPN11 or KRAS mutations are present, and in patients with CBL syndrome. Also, the high brain tumor risk in patients with L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria may warrant regular screening with brain MRIs. For most syndromes, surveillance may be needed for nonmalignant health problems. Clin Cancer Res; 23(12); e83-e90. ©2017 AACRSee all articles in the online-only CCR Pediatric Oncology Series.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 17%
Other 13 15%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Professor 5 6%
Other 21 24%
Unknown 21 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 26 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2018.
All research outputs
#1,118,539
of 12,695,728 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Cancer Research
#818
of 9,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,914
of 265,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Cancer Research
#29
of 142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,695,728 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,216 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,694 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.