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Recommendations for Childhood Cancer Screening and Surveillance in DNA Repair Disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Cancer Research, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
Title
Recommendations for Childhood Cancer Screening and Surveillance in DNA Repair Disorders
Published in
Clinical Cancer Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-17-0465
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael F. Walsh, Vivian Y. Chang, Wendy K. Kohlmann, Hamish S. Scott, Christopher Cunniff, Franck Bourdeaut, Jan J. Molenaar, Christopher C. Porter, John T. Sandlund, Sharon E. Plon, Lisa L. Wang, Sharon A. Savage

Abstract

DNA repair syndromes are heterogeneous disorders caused by pathogenic variants in genes encoding proteins key in DNA replication and/or the cellular response to DNA damage. The majority of these syndromes are inherited in an autosomal-recessive manner, but autosomal-dominant and X-linked recessive disorders also exist. The clinical features of patients with DNA repair syndromes are highly varied and dependent on the underlying genetic cause. Notably, all patients have elevated risks of syndrome-associated cancers, and many of these cancers present in childhood. Although it is clear that the risk of cancer is increased, there are limited data defining the true incidence of cancer and almost no evidence-based approaches to cancer surveillance in patients with DNA repair disorders. This article is the product of the October 2016 AACR Childhood Cancer Predisposition Workshop, which brought together experts from around the world to discuss and develop cancer surveillance guidelines for children with cancer-prone disorders. Herein, we focus on the more common of the rare DNA repair disorders: ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, dyskeratosis congenita, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, and Xeroderma pigmentosum. Dedicated syndrome registries and a combination of basic science and clinical research have led to important insights into the underlying biology of these disorders. Given the rarity of these disorders, it is recommended that centralized centers of excellence be involved directly or through consultation in caring for patients with heritable DNA repair syndromes. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); e23-e31. ©2017 AACRSee all articles in the online-only CCR Pediatric Oncology Series.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 95 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 22%
Other 12 13%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 9%
Other 22 23%
Unknown 12 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Psychology 2 2%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 16 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,582,476
of 15,780,427 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Cancer Research
#1,191
of 10,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,730
of 272,033 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Cancer Research
#38
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,780,427 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,534 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,033 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.