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Prenatal Testing for Adult-Onset Conditions: the Position of the National Society of Genetic Counselors

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Genetic Counseling, July 2016
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Title
Prenatal Testing for Adult-Onset Conditions: the Position of the National Society of Genetic Counselors
Published in
Journal of Genetic Counseling, July 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10897-016-9992-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Hercher, Wendy R. Uhlmann, Erin P. Hoffman, Shanna Gustafson, Kelly M. Chen

Abstract

Advances in genetic testing and the availability of such testing in pregnancy allows prospective parents to test their future child for adult-onset conditions. This ability raises several complex ethical issues. Prospective parents have reproductive rights to obtain information about their fetus. This information may or may not alter pregnancy management. These rights can be in conflict with the rights of the future individual, who will be denied the right to elect or decline testing. This paper highlights the complexity of these issues, details discussions that went into the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Public Policy Task Force's development of the Prenatal testing for Adult-Onset Conditions position statement adopted in November 2014, and cites relevant literature on this topic through December 2015. Issues addressed include parental rights and autonomy, rights of the future child, the right not to know, possible adverse effects on childhood and the need for genetic counseling. This paper will serve as a reference to genetic counselors and healthcare professionals when faced with this situation in clinical practice.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 39%
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Researcher 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 18%
Philosophy 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 July 2016.
All research outputs
#10,938,783
of 12,342,655 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#578
of 637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,761
of 266,688 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#25
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,655 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 637 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,688 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.